Business identity theft is alive and well

Business identity theft is alive and well

And it can happen to your business.

Criminals do not discriminate. Any type of business or organization – of any size or structure, including sole proprietorships, partnerships, LLCs, trusts, non-profits, municipalities and county governments, school districts and corporations – is susceptible to business identity theft.

What exactly is business identity theft? First, let’s clarify that we are not talking about an information security breach or an incident involving the loss of confidential consumer information. Rather, business identity theft in this context involves the actual impersonation of the business itself.

It happens when criminals pose as owners, officers, or employees of a business in order to get their hands on cash, credit, or loans. And this often leaves the actual business to deal with the debt. A favorite tactic of identity thieves involves the theft of the tax identification number (TIN) or employer identification number (EIN) of the company or the owners’ personal information. Identity thieves often use that data to open new lines of credit or obtain a business loan based on the company’s identity.

Another common form of business identity theft is when criminals file fake documents with the Secretary of State’s office to change company information such as its registered address or the names of directors, officers or managers. Once the records have been changed, the identity thieves can establish lines of credit or new accounts with the false information.

Other examples of the fraudulent use of a company’s information include: current or former employees making use of their access to financial documentation; establishing a temporary office space or merchant accounts in a company’s name; going through a business’s trash and recycling bins to find account numbers or other sensitive data; using phishing attacks or other scams to get the business’s banking or credit information from employees; and filing for tax credits with stolen EINs.

Businesses are an attractive target for identity thieves. Generally speaking, a company will have higher credit limits than an individual, so opening a new account or line of credit in a business’s name will yield more cash for a criminal and such larger purchases will receive less scrutiny. Perhaps most frustrating, however, companies are required by law to report certain identifiers (an address, EIN/TIN, and names of directors in most states), meaning the information is publicly available and easily accessible to anyone.

The invoicing and payment terms typically available to businesses can also work against them. Identity thieves may have a window of up to 30 days after a purchase to disappear before a company detects a problem – and even longer if the thieves use a different address.

Unfortunately, business identity theft is an underreported crime for a variety of reasons. Companies often have no idea their identity has been compromised until they begin receiving unfamiliar bills and collection notices. And when this happens, it is already too late to stop the thieves. Government agencies receive frequent requests for changes to company information and an address change is unlikely to raise red flags. Some businesses aren’t paying close enough attention or fail to caution employees about the possibility of phishing scams, while others may be embarrassed or concerned about their reputation with customers and don’t want to report what happened.

Given the underreporting problem, statistics on business identity theft can be hard to come by. However, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) said it has seen the number of corporate tax returns flagged for potential business identity theft increase exponentially in recent years: From 350 in 2015 to 4,000 in 2016 with a jump to 10,000 in only the first six months of 2017. The cost of the damage has also risen dramatically, from $122 million in 2015 to $268 million the following year and $137 million for just the first half of 2017.

Importantly, these numbers reflect just one of the many forms of business identity scams.

What can companies do to protect themselves? Click here for a checklist of the most important steps for prevention and what to do if your business becomes a victim.

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